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Ceratosaurus juvenile by WaylonRowley Ceratosaurus juvenile by WaylonRowley
This is sort of a WIP, but I'm happy with it for the most part. It was done for the North American Museum of Ancient Life. I based it off of a Ceratosaurus specimen on display there. And yes, the fangs really are that big in the fossil.
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:iconmarmot-of-doom:
Marmot-of-Doom Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I tried to research something about why ceratosaurus' teeth were so huge but no one on the internet seems to notice :O
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:iconterminator7000:
terminator7000 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2010  Student Digital Artist
holly crap looks like he can bite someone in half with thos 1 meter long teeth but still probably took a long time to draw the skin
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:iconriotgirlckb:
riotgirlckb Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2010  Student Traditional Artist
that is great
imagine being bitten by one of them
would beat a carnotaurus any day
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:iconstray-sketches:
Stray-Sketches Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
even with those HUGE teeth, i can't help but to find him CUTE!!!!

awesome picture! very life-like :D
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2007
Thanks, ferahgo. I'm still working out the kinks in that technique, though. I need to pay more attention to my light source, I think. We'll see if I can fix that in my next drawing, which should be ready in roughly a week, universe permitting.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2007  Professional General Artist
Wow, that has got to be the most impressive scale detail I have seen in quite a while.
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:iconelegaer:
elegaer Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2007
Wonderful picture. And I won't tell you the teeth look too big LOL. I can't see a problem with them, though I can't really tell much from the size of the photo of this little brat. I've certainly seen similar sized rows of fangs on other creatures. I would question how he *used* them, but I don't think I'd question the size.
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2007
My guess is that it was an ambush predator that avoided prolonged struggles with prey (the teeth were very thin). It might inflict a few very deep bites, and allow the victim to bleed out. This might explain why the teeth seem relatively bigger in juveniles. They needed to accomplish the same task with a smaller overall body size. Just a guess, until I get the time machine working again (cracked head gasket).
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:iconmerlinstouch:
Merlinstouch Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2007
Very nice
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:iconmystical-machine-gun:
mystical-machine-gun Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2007
I love it. Words cannot describe . . . :hug: it and you!
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:iconwarrenjb:
WarrenJB Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2007
I'm afrid I'm going to have to go with everyone else and say "Whoa! Big teeth!" But I'm not going to dispute them. :D

Excellent work overall, and kudos on the scales. They turned out really well. I know doing that'd probably drive me up the wall.
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:iconsilvahscales:
SilvahScales Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2007
lol two words-----big teeth =D it must take a long time to make all those scales..it sure takes me a while
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2007
Yeah...sometimes it sucks, sometimes I'm in the zone and can draw them for hours. Thanks for commenting, and the fav!
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:iconsilvahscales:
SilvahScales Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2007
no prob =D same deal with me
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:iconmountaineer47:
Mountaineer47 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
It's a gorgeous piece! Cerato did have huge teeth...but this does look a little weird. :) But it's still a favorite and I applaud you for the detail...it's lovely!

-Erin
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
Thanks for the compliment. I tried to shade each scale individually, to give it more of a beady look. The scan wasn't that great. I intend to fix a few errors and rescan in higher res. Thanks again :)
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:iconmountaineer47:
Mountaineer47 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2007
Awesome. I did notice that each individual scale was unique...and I again applaud you for patience. :) You've got what it takes! Definitely!

-Erin
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I pay homage to the work you have put into this, looks great, but i have to agree with others about the teeth...
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
Thank you for the comment, Tuomas :)
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:icondinomaniac:
Dinomaniac Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
to me it rather look that the teeth have dropped down on their sockets and the tooth root part is visible. So I'm not that sure that it had such a long teeth although ceratosaurus had BIG teeth.
Cool stuff again!
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
Yes, the teeth do look abnormally large, but that's how the skull has been restored at Western Paleo Labs. I have a bunch of reference photos of the skull if you or anyone else would like them. The nasal horn is especially weird. I held the original fossil in my hand, just to make sure...and it seems to bulge a bit near the top, as if the horn became a boss instead of a blade. That must change during ontogeny, because the adults definitely have a more blade-like horn. Or, maybe it's simply a new species of Ceratosaurus (it hasn't been assigned yet, though). Dan Chure or Brooks Britt will be describing it soon I'm told.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2007
Very nicely done. I'm tempted to add this to my favorites. That is one large fanged Ceratosaur. Wow. I don't think anything wants to be prey to this guy. I think you did a good job not adding any furry integument to this gentleman here, as now most theropod drawing are being filled with integument. I don't know which stance to take, though. Just because some had it, doesn't mean they all had it, and I think bigger carnivores have enough heat in their bodies to not need integument either...so...good job.
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:iconwaylonrowley:
WaylonRowley Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2007
Ah, thank you very much. As you can tell, I'm not a fan of fuzziness. If I do draw coelurosaurs in the future, they'll be few and far between. The idea of a Ceratosaurus having protofeathers is (to me) completely and utterly ludicrous. We have scutes from another specimen showing that armor was present, and it was closely related to Carnotaurus, which also had scutes and scales. What more can you ask for? Personally, I think fluff originated in basal coelurosauria, and should be limited to that clade. We have preserved integument for 'Ceratosaurs' and 'Allosaurs', both of which have scales. Until we find evidence to the contrary in primitive theropods, I'll play it safe. I shall put an end to this featheriferous heresy...by bringing scaly back. Hehe
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2007
Good job. Good good job. I say their babies might have had them, but once they're full grown, gigantic adults, they would not possess these feathers due to whatever thermodynamics they posess. The bigger, the warmer=less need for feather. 'Sides, most of these dinos evolved these protofeathers as a mean of insulation, coz I honestly don't see any of those generally short armed theropods using these to levitate or whatever...except for the usual suspects=the sinornithoidids, or however you spell that.. Besides, there's still no proof that these "carnosaurs" posessed the feathers...its all BS.
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